WCSU News

Theatre Arts Department named ‘most underrated program in northeast region’ by theatre blog

image of the WCSU Dance Studio

Students rehearse choreography in the Dance Studio

 

Regardless of all the awards, accolades and publicity the Western Connecticut State University Department of Theatre Arts and its state-of-the-art Visual and Performing Arts Center have received, apparently there are still some out there who have not fully appreciated the level of the program’s accomplishments, which has led to WestConn being named number one on the list of “The Top Ten Most Underrated College Theatre Programs for 2017 – Northeast Region” by OnStage blog.

Image of the exterior of the WCSU Visual and Performing Arts Center

The exterior of the WCSU Visual and Performing Arts Center

 

According to OnStage, “We spend months compiling, researching and comparing college theatre programs to come up with what we feel are the very best colleges in the country. While [some schools] get plenty of attention, there are a ton of schools out there with incredible programs that deserve more. … Whether they are programs that have amazing facilities and curriculum or have a ton of value when it comes to their cost, these are schools that are doing tremendous things in theatre that might not be known on a national level.”

 

A scene from WCSU's KCACTF award-winning production

A scene from WCSU’s KCACTF award-winning production

 

How does one measure a theatre program’s success? Is it based on winning performance awards? This is something the WCSU theatre arts program has done consistently at the highest level, including back-to-back years taking regional and national awards at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival in 2016 and 2017.

 

 

 

Image of WCSU's MainStage Theatre in the Visual and Performing Arts Center

The MainStage Theatre in the Visual and Performing Arts Center

 

Or is it based on assessment of the theatre arts facility, as evidenced by awards from Connecticut Magazine – Best of Connecticut: “Best Performing Arts Venue: College;” Collegedegreesearch.net – “The 25 Most Amazing Campus Arts Centers;” and AIA New England – Peoples’ Choice Awards: “The space where I’d most like to study” – Finalist.

 

 

image of WCSU production of "Twelfth Night"

WCSU production of “Twelfth Night”

 

WCSU School of Visual and Performing Arts Dean Brian Vernon responded to the OnStage ranking. “We do some of the finest work that I’ve ever seen on any stage,” he said. “It’s an honor to receive this validation and recognition.” 

 

 

 

 

image of the WCSU scene shop

The WCSU scene shop

 

 

Theatre Arts Department Chair Pamela McDaniel added, “The numbers speak for themselves: 110 theatre majors when we moved into our new facility in 2014 compared to 170 this fall. Acknowledgements like these continue to shine a light on our department’s commitment to excellence in training, performance and theatrical production.”

 

 

 

Theatre Arts Professor Sal Trapani echoed these sentiments. “We are a demanding and challenging program that accepts nothing but the best from our students,” he said. “We are dedicated to professionalism and a commitment to excellence. That is why students flock here. Plus, we have one of the best and most beautiful performing arts facilities in the country. Our teaching artists are all working professionals from New York. And we are affordable.”

 

 

Underrated? If you say so. Award-winning? Absolutely!

WCSU to present forum on ‘DACA, Dreamers and Deportation’

Panelists to discuss Trump administration decision to rescind DACA and its impact

DANBURY, CONN. — Western Connecticut State University will present the forum, “DACA, Dreamers and Deportation: New Developments,” on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, from 2 to 5 p.m. in Warner Hall on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury.

WCSU Professor of Sociology Dr. Carina Bandhauer will lead the panel discussion about the Trump administration’s decision to rescind the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program and the ramifications of this change. The forum will be free and the public is invited. Cosponsors are the School of Arts and Sciences, the Office of Diversity and Equity, the Office of InterCultural Affairs, and members of the Connecticut Students 4 a Dream.

The panel discussion will be offered as part of the WCSU celebration of Hispanic-Latino Heritage Month, a diverse program of university events in September and October that also features lectures, a documentary film screening and dinners with a Hispanic and Latin American theme.

For more information, contact Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Daryle Dennis at dennisd@wcsu.edu or the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

 

 

‘Sip & Sketch’ evening at WCSU pairs art with wine & refreshments

Guests of all artistic levels invited to participate in Oct. 6 event

DANBURY, CONN. — An entertaining creative evening that pairs the experience of drawing from a live model with wine and refreshments will be offered in the “Sip and Sketch” series event to be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, at Western Connecticut State University.

Guests of all artistic skill levels are invited to create original drawings as they enjoy wine and assorted snacks during the “Sip and Sketch” evening in the Drawing Studio, Room 241 of the WCSU Visual and Performing Arts Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. The ticket fee of $25 per person includes admission and refreshments as well as basic art supplies including charcoal and paper. Attendees are welcome to bring their own drawing supplies if they wish.

Admission to the event is open to adults 21 years of age and older. Reservations should be made online at www.wcsuvpac.eventbrite.com. The “Sip and Sketch” series is sponsored by Whole Foods Market Danbury and presented by the Department of Art at WCSU.

For more information, contact the Department of Art at (203) 837-8403 or the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

 

WCSU students’ murals create a children’s playhouse for all seasons

Original art works brighten WCSU Day Care Center playground

DANBURY, CONN. — An original mural created this summer by three Western Connecticut State University students has transformed the children’s playhouse at the WCSU Child Care Center into a true play space for all seasons, designed as part of the recent renovation of the center’s outdoor playground on the university’s Midtown campus in Danbury. The mural project was inspired by a suggestion offered by WCSU Art Gallery Curator Melissa Ralston-Jones, parent of a child previously enrolled at the center, and coordinated by Child Care Center Director Lauren Halpin. Pictured are the WCSU art students who volunteered their time and talents to paint mural panels of spring, summer, autumn and winter scenes on the four exterior walls of the playhouse, including (left to right): Jesse Navarra, of Stormville, New York; Andrea Rios, of New Fairfield; and Brooke Vitetta, of Brookfield.

For more information, contact the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

WCSU offers events to celebrate Hispanic-Latino Heritage Month

Featured programs include dinners, lectures and film screening

DANBURY, CONN. — Western Connecticut State University will celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month with a diverse program of campus events in September and October including lectures, a documentary film screening and dinners with a Hispanic and Latin American theme.

The WCSU celebration of Hispanic-Latino Heritage Month, recognized by the U.S. Congress for the period from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, 2017, will kick off with a Hispanic/Latin American dinner served from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 20, at the Marketplace in the Campus Center on the Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. The public is invited to attend at a cost of $9.75 per guest; RSVP is requested at dennisd@wcsu.edu. Cosponsors are Sodexo Food Service and the Office of InterCultural Affairs.

Connecticut State Police Lt. Col. David Rosado, commanding officer of the Office of Field Operations in the police division’s Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, will deliver the Hispanic-Latino Heritage Month keynote address at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 28, in the North Ballroom of the Campus Center on the Westside campus. Admission will be free and open to the public. The talk is cosponsored by the Justice and Law Administration Division, the Office of Diversity and Equity, and the Office of InterCultural Affairs.

Rosado’s promotion to lieutenant colonel in 2016 made the 19-year veteran trooper of Puerto Rican descent the highest-ranking Latino ever to serve in the Connecticut State Police. He holds responsibility for an office that oversees approximately 700 troopers engaged in field work at troop headquarters statewide and at special units ranging from traffic control to counter-terrorism and firearms trafficking. Previous leadership positions in the State Police have included commands for units in labor relations, internal affairs and criminal investigation as well as troop headquarters at Bradley International Airport and Hartford. Rosado holds a J.D. degree from the University of Connecticut School of Law and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy.

Other public events featured during the WCSU celebration of Hispanic-Latino Heritage month will include:

  • Tuesday, Oct. 3: A public forum, “DACA, Dreamers and Deportation: New Developments,” will be from 2 to 5 p.m. in Warner Hall on the Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury. Professor of Sociology Dr. Carina Bandhauer will lead a panel discussion about the Trump administration’s decision to rescind the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program and the ramifications of such change. Sponsored by the Division of Arts and Sciences; Office of Diversity and Equity; Office of Intercultural Affairs; and members of the Connecticut Students 4 a Dream.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 4: Dr. Donald Gagnon, WCSU professor of English and recipient of the 2017 Provost’s Prize for Teaching, will discuss the Hispanic connection to the New York Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem in a faculty lecture at 5:30 p.m. on the first floor of Warner Hall on the Midtown campus. The talk is free and the public is invited; cosponsors are the English Department and the Office of InterCultural Affairs.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 10: The documentary film, “Latin Explosion: A New America,” will be screened at 7 p.m. in the Student Center Theater on the Midtown campus. The film, which explores the far-reaching influence of Latin music on American culture, will be followed by a question-and-answer session. Cosponsors are the Latin American Student Organization, the Office of Diversity and Equity, and the Office of InterCultural Affairs.
  • Wednesday, Oct. 11: A dinner offering “A Taste of Latin America” will be from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Student Center Restaurant on the Midtown campus. The public is invited to attend at a cost of $9.75 per guest; RSVP is requested at dennisd@wcsu.edu. Cosponsors are Sodexo Food Service and the Office of InterCultural Affairs.

For more information, contact Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Daryle Dennis at dennisd@wcsu.edu or the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

 

 

WCSU Observatory to offer planetarium shows, sky viewings

Saturday evening programs scheduled from Sept. 30 through Dec. 16

DANBURY, CONN. — Western Connecticut State University will host eight Saturday evening shows and viewings of prominent planetary and stellar objects in the sky during public nights from Sept. 30 through Dec. 16, 2017,  at the WCSU Planetarium and Observatory on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury.

WCSU Observatory presentations will include a one-hour planetarium show followed by telescope viewing of the moon, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune as well as star systems, clusters and nebulae visible during the autumn months. The Observatory, located atop a hill near Pinney Hall, offers viewings through a 20-inch, computer-controlled Ritchey-Chretien reflector telescope.

Admission is free and the public is invited. Limited parking is provided adjacent to the observatory, with additional parking available on University Boulevard.

Planetarium shows are appropriate for adults and older children, and will be canceled only in the event of hazardous road conditions or severe weather that would pose a safety risk. The viewing period will not be offered during public nights when cloud cover prevents sky observations. For updates to confirm plans for a scheduled public night, call (203) 837-8672 on the day of the event.

Following is the schedule of WCSU Planetarium and Observatory public nights, with the most prominent visible objects listed in the order of their celestial appearance during the viewing period for the evening:

  • 30: The planetarium show will start at 7 p.m., with sky observation following from 8 to 10 p.m. Visible objects will include Saturn, M13, the waxing gibbous moon, the Ring Nebula, Epsilon Lyrae, M11, M15, M2, Neptune, Uranus and the Andromeda galaxy.
  • 14: The planetarium show will start at 6 p.m., with sky observation following from 7 to 9 p.m. Visible objects will include the Ring Nebula, Albireo, M11, M15, M2, Neptune, Uranus and Andromeda.
  • 28: The planetarium show will start at 6 p.m., with sky observation following from 7 to 9 p.m. Visible objects will include the moon near first quarter, M15, M2, Neptune, Uranus, Andromeda and the Perseus galaxy cluster.
  • 11: The planetarium show will start at 5 p.m., with sky observation following from 6 to 8 p.m. Visible objects will include Albireo, M15, M2, Neptune, Uranus, Andromeda, the Cassiopeia star clusters and the Perseus cluster.
  • 18: The planetarium show will start at 5 p.m., with sky observation following from 6 to 8 p.m. Visible objects will include M15; M2; Neptune; Uranus; Andromeda; the Cassiopeia and Perseus clusters; and the Pleiades star cluster.
  • 2: The planetarium show will start at 5 p.m., with sky observation following from 6 to 8 p.m. Visible objects will include the nearly full moon; Neptune; Uranus; and the Perseus and Pleiades clusters.
  • 16: The planetarium show will start at 5 p.m., with sky observation following from 6 to 8 p.m. Visible objects will include Neptune; Andromeda; Neptune; Uranus; and the Cassiopeia, Perseus and Pleiades clusters.

For more information, visit www.wcsu.edu/starwatch/.

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

 

 

Google comes to WestConn

Instructional seminar free and open to the public

DANBURY, Conn. — The Communication and Media Arts Department at Western Connecticut State University will host a seminar on Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017, to teach anyone how to work in Google programs to gather and analyze data. The seminar is free and open to the public. It will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  in Room 202 of the Student Center on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury. Participants may attend all four hours or come and go as they please.

From 9 to 10 a.m., learn about Google News Lab, Advanced Search, Image Search, Scholar, Alerts, Public Data Explorer and Trends. From 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. and again from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., YouTube for Content Creators will be featured. From 11:30 to 12:30 p.m., explore Google Maps, 360 Photos and Time Travel.

The seminar will be free and open to the public. Bring a phone or laptop and lunch. Before the seminar, go to http://g.co.newslab to download files. To reserve a seat, go to https://alumni.wcsu.edu/communication-seminar.

“Everyone should go to this seminar — it will help anyone who wants to improve their data literacy skills,” said Dr. JC Barone, WCSU associate professor of Communication and Media Arts. “Anyone who gathers information or analyzes data should attend.”

For more information, call the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

### Western ###

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

WCSU to present fall semester M.F.A. artist lecture series

Painter Stanley Lewis featured Sept. 25 in first of five artist talks through November

DANBURY, CONN. — Five critically acclaimed artists whose paintings, illustrations and mixed-media works have been shown internationally will discuss their artistic philosophies and creative process during the Western Connecticut State University fall semester Master of Fine Arts lecture series continuing from Sept. 25 through Nov. 20, 2017.

All lectures, sponsored by the WCSU Department of Art M.F.A. in Visual Arts program, will be at 11 a.m. in Room 144 of the Visual and Performing Arts Center on the WCSU  Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. Admission will be free and the public is invited; registration is suggested at www.wcsuvpac.eventbrite.com.

The series will begin on Monday, Sept. 25, with a lecture by painter Stanley Lewis, an M.F.A. graduate of Yale University and recipient of Danforth and Guggenheim fellowships whose artistic career spans more than five decades. His numerous solo and group exhibitions have included shows at the Betty Cunningham and Bowery galleries, the New York Studio School, the Katzen Art Center at American University, and the Visual Arts Center of New Jersey. He has served as art teacher and critic at institutions including NYSS, Kansas City Art Institute, American University and Smith College, and his works are held in the National Academy Museum, William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation and other major collections.

Lewis frequently employs a “cut and assemble” process to create layered paintings and drawings with textured bas-relief surfaces. David Carbone observed in the online magazine Artcritical that Lewis portrays “deliberately banal subjects — backyards, suburban scenes, calendar views of Lake Chautauqua — transformed by a brilliant but tortured way of realizing a painterly image that can yield work of rare satisfaction and ambition. The fascination he arouses comes partially from an almost irreconcilable tension between working directly from observation with exacting attention to small forms, and a very contemporary, almost sculptural painting process that builds a work with obsessively dense materiality.”  Julian Keimer wrote in Art in America that “the frenetic intensity he brings to capturing his hushed suburban landscape is humbling.”

Other presentations featured in the fall 2017 M.FA. artist lecture series will include:

  • Monday, Oct. 9: Painter Kyle Staver, a Minnesota native who now works in New York, holds an M.F.A. from Yale University and has earned numerous honors including the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award, the National Academy Museum Altman Figure Prize, the Guggenheim Fellowship and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Purchase Prize. In his blog on the Huffington Post, critic William Eckhardt Kohler described Staver among the foremost contemporary artists in “the grand Western figurative tradition,” noting that she has found “new joy and invention in its language” to create figures with “monumentality as if they had been pulled and molded directly out of clay…. Staver makes paintings that she views as manifestations of personal feeling and experience through the symbolic language of myth.” She has shown her works at galleries and museums in New York, Pennsylvania and California, and has been a visiting artist at many art schools and universities including WCSU.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 24: Illustrator Guy Billout began his career in advertising in his native France before moving to the United States in 1969, bringing an improvised and unique portfolio of illustrations that was published in entirety by New York magazine. Billout has established a distinctively minimalist style that uses dramatic imagery with clean lines in ironic illustrations published over more than four decades in The Atlantic, The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Rolling Stone and other national publications. Upon his Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame induction in 2016, design critic Veronique Vienne described Billout as “the Buster Keaton of the illustration world. His illustrations represent acrobatic feats of mental agility in which events challenge the law of physics and logic — inverted perspectives, gravity-defying structures, upside-down skies, large objects sinking into shallow puddles — yet his characters retain a sense of composure no matter what.” He also has authored books including five works that earned selection by the New York Times for Best Illustrated Children’s Books.
  • Monday, Nov. 6: Painter, drawer and collage artist Stephanie Franks creates her works at a studio in her native New York City and has participated in more than 60 exhibitions during the past 32 years at sites in the United States and abroad including the Bowery Gallery, the Sideshow Gallery, the National Academy Museum, the New York Studio School, the New Bedford Art Museum and Haverford College. Her works were featured in Japan at a show for four New York artists at the Higashi Hiroshima Museum. Recipient of an M.F.A. from Queens College, she has been an educator at the Pratt Institute, Parsons School of Design, Chautauqua Institute and other art schools, and artist-in-residence at Yaddo and St. Margaret’s Bay. “My work is a search for relationships of color and form that feel true,” Franks said. “My drawings explore the space between me and what I am observing, erasing and redefining to discover the image. In my paintings and collages, I may begin with a perceived motif but, as I find my way with color, I go where the work leads me.”
  • Monday, Nov. 20:  Painter Gideon Bok, who earned his M.F.A. from Yale University, has shown his works in 18 solo exhibitions and more than 50 group exhibitions at galleries and museums in Boston, New York, his native Maine and across the United States. Writing in the online arts publication Hyperallergic, critic John Yau observed that Bok creates “several paintings at once, working within a predetermined timeframe to keep the ambient light in the painting consistent.” He described a recent series of Bok paintings as explorations of “the convoluted union between ordinariness and strangeness that is synonymous with daily living,” while other recent works “use his cluttered studio space as the starting point for investigations into perception, perspective and time.” Bok has taught at Hampshire College, Boston University and more than a dozen other institutions from Bowdoin and Marlboro colleges to the University of Maine and the University of Oklahoma. His works are held in major collections including the Boston Athenaeum, the American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York, the Farnsworth Art Museum in Maine, and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art in Wisconsin. He is a past Guggenheim Fellow and recipient of the American Academy’s Hassam, Speicher, Betts and Symons Fund Purchase Award.

For more information, contact the WCSU Department of Art at (203) 837-8403.

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

 

 

WCSU Institute for Holistic Health Studies announces Wellness Wednesday workshops, more

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University Institute for Holistic Health Studies (IHHS), contained within the Department of Health Promotion and Exercise Sciences (HPX), continues its focus on promoting health and wellbeing for the community by hosting a series of new “Wellness Wednesday” workshops this semester. Wellness Wednesday workshops are one of the many educational offerings from the HPX department and the IHHS at WCSU. The series is designed to bring greater awareness to the many influences on our health and well-being, and to provide simple and easy practices to promote general health.

The workshops, free of charge and open to the public, will be at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesdays in Room 127 of White Hall on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury. This series of workshops will begin on Wednesday, Sept. 13.

The series will include:

Sept. 13: “Introduction to the Integrative Approach to Health” with Dr. Michael Finkelstein. In this presentation, Finkelstein will discuss the emerging field of Integrative Medicine and provide useful information and guidance on the practical ways to incorporate complementary medicine into your personal life. Drawing on years of experience and training, this is good news for all those looking to feel more in control of their health and leave feeling refreshed with an optimistic perspective. Learn more at http://slowmedicinedoctor.com/slow-medicine/. 

Sept. 27: “Acupuncture for Stress Management” with Licensed Acupuncturist Laura Shahinian Kara. Acupuncture has been used to stimulate health and healing for centuries and has gained popularity in the U.S .today. Learn about the benefits of acupuncture and how it can help to treat everyday ailments and promote health of body, mind and spirit. Visit http://www.aculaura.com/ to learn more. 

Oct. 11: “Decoding Food Labels” with Clinical Nutritionist Deb Oria. Have you ever wondered about what is on those food labels and what it all means? What about those health claims on food packaging? Do you wonder if certain ingredients are actually good for you? Learn about this and more at this fun and informative talk. You will leave armed with knowledge and tools to help you make more healthful food choices when you shop. Learn more at http://yourbesthealthllc.com/.

Oct. 25: “Poetry and Journaling for Self and Social Action” with Holistic Mental Health Clinician and Reiki Master Rebecca Schoenewolf. Journaling — “writing to heal” — has been proven to help in problem solving, stress management and improving physical and mental health. Learn how poetry and journaling can give us a new perspective on ourselves and the world. Visit http://www.rsholisticservices.com/ to learn more.

Nov 8: “Drumming for the Health of It” with Herman Olivera. Drumming is not only fun, but has many health benefits. Join Olivera, drummer, life coach and shamanic healer to learn what drumming can do for you .Visit  http://www.hermanolivera.com for more information.

Nov. 29: “Pilates for You” with Marion Cooper, Pilates instructor and owner of Mind-Body Connection. Cooper will share information and easy-to-use Pilates exercises and techniques to address common aches and pains, reduce stress and restore health and vitality. Visit http://www.mind-bodyconnection.com to learn more.

In addition to Wednesday workshops, the IHHS will offer several other events this semester. These events include:

Sahaja Yoga Meditation Series

This meditation takes place on the second Tuesday of the month (Sept. 12, Oct. 10, Nov. 14 and Dec.12, 2017) in Room 103 of Warner Hall on the Midtown campus. This is a seated meditation, which incorporates aspects of yoga, including breath work, finger mudras and chakra clearing.   

Special Event — Stress Management Lecture

On Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. in Ives Concert Hall in White Hall on the Midtown campus, Dr. Brian Luke Seaward will present “Stressed is Desserts Spelled Backwards.” Stress is a part of our lives in 21st century America, but instead of stress managing us, we can learn to manage it. Seaward is a recognized authority on stress-related illnesses and proven practices to defuse stress and promote health, including meditation and mindfulness. His work has been published in a variety of printed and digital materials, and presented at TED lectures. A book signing will immediately follow his presentation. Tickets are available online at www.wcsu.edu/tickets and at WCSU box office locations in the Midtown Student Center and Westside Campus Center for $15.

Christel Autuori, IHHS director, said, “As evidenced by the increasing attendance at the Wellness Wednesday workshops, the community is interested in learning about the many aspects of health and wellbeing. People are curious about other approaches to health besides our Western medical model and want to learn to incorporate healthier choices and habits in their lives. I am pleased that the IHHS is able to provide such programs and workshops to the university and greater Danbury community.”

The IHHS is dedicated to promoting health and wellness to the university and greater Danbury area through widely available programming and lectures. Its holistic perspective on health and healing integrates conventional healing with modern alternative and traditional techniques from around the world.

For more information, visit www.wcsu.edu/ihhs/.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.

 

 

WCSU Police hold cancer fundraiser in memory of lost colleagues

DANBURY, CONN. — “A Walk to Remember,” a cancer awareness and prevention fundraiser sponsored by the Western Connecticut State University Police Benevolent Association, will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, on the university’s Midtown campus at 181 White St. in Danbury. The fundraiser is open to the public with a $15 entrance fee, $10 for students.

The 1.5-mile walk will start at the Alumni Circle before proceeding to White Street, then toward Locust Avenue, completing a full circuit of the campus and ending once again at the Alumni Circle.

Eleanor Chance, a WCSU building and grounds patrol officer, raised the idea for the event after the chief of the WCSU Police Department, Neil McLaughlin, passed away in April 2015; Ernest Leclercq, also a building and grounds officer, passed away in September 2015; and Shirley Hatch, a secretary in the Police Department, passed away in August 2016.

“Shirley would enjoy walking the Midtown perimeter during her lunch breaks, which gave me the idea for the fundraiser,” Chance said.

“A Walk to Remember” has been six months in the making, from the time Chance approached WCSU Lt. Richard Montefusco with the idea. She received the support of her department and began planning.

The fundraiser is in memory of all who have lost the battle with cancer, and proceeds will be donated to Regional Hospice and Palliative Care of Danbury.

“I hope people will walk with a sense of pride and compassion,” Chance said, “knowing that those we have lost will always be remembered.”

For more information, email Chance at chancee@wcsu.edu.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University offers outstanding faculty in a range of quality academic programs. Our diverse university community provides students an enriching and supportive environment that takes advantage of the unique cultural offerings of Western Connecticut and New York. Our vision: To be an affordable public university with the characteristics of New England’s best small private universities.